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Fishing Costs

If you want to learn about fishing costs, or how much you might need to invest to go fishing, you can get more information in this section. Find out how to enjoy a fun day on the water with family and friends regardless of your budget or experience level.

Basic Fishing Costs

Whether you want to buy a boat, or prefer to fish from the banks of a local pond, there are fishing experiences to fit every budget. Anyone can learn how to fish and enjoy the fun of taking local fishing trips with friends or family.


This list of basic fishing costs will give you a general idea of what to expect as you get started.

  1. Fishing licenses.
    When it comes to fishing license cost, freshwater and saltwater fishing license costs will vary by state, but several states offer discounts for veterans and seniors. Some states even offer the option for a family fishing license.
  2. Free fishing days.
    If you aren't sure if you want to invest in the fishing license cost right away, remember that each state offers a select number of free fishing days each year. These free fishing day events give you the opportunity to try fishing without the need to purchase a license (all other fishing laws and regulations apply).
  3. Cheap fishing rods/poles.
    Inexpensive freshwater rod and reel combos can be purchased for about $30 or $40, and kids' fishing combos can run as little as $15 to $20. If you just want to try fishing for a day or two, some local outfitters and fishing piers may offer you the option to rent fishing gear.
  4. Natural bait and artificial lures.
    As far as selecting bait or lures, you can stop at a bait shop to pick up worms or crickets to use as freshwater fishing bait for a few dollars and look for fishing hooks or cheap fishing lures that are on sale.
  5. Places to fish.
    Whether you want to consider the cost of a boat or go fishing from shore, there are plenty of options. If you don’t have a boat, consider fishing from a public fishing pier, pond, lake, beach, or shoreline at little to no cost.

For more information on fishing licenses or to find good places to fish near you, check out the state fishing and boating pages.