Know the Best Knot for Braided Line

Fishing knots can be intimidating for beginning anglers. Some knots are versatile, while others are rather specific for their use, such as when using different kinds of fishing line. Braided line knots are one of those cases.

Braided line is unique in that it lacks line “memory.” That is, it doesn’t remember being tightly wound on a spool and will cast smoothly, without the loose wavy loops you might get with monofilament. This translates to further casts.

It also is more visible and does not stretch. With practice, you’ll learn how to adjust your fishing techniques when fishing with braid.  Because of these two features, anglers often tie a fluorocarbon leader which stretches and is much less visible.  There is some debate here as far as what is the best knot for braided line but the Alberto has worked well and is a favorite for pro anglers such as Aaron Martens.

Most anglers seem to agree that the best knot for braided line connection to a lure or hook is the Palomar knot.  Not only does this test highest as far as strength of braided line knots, but it can be tied quickly, with cold fingers. Generally braid is used for medium to heavy lure fishing such as working big jigs or topwater lures in heavy vegetation for big bass. Big jigs or topwater frogs have larger hook eyes so I don’t need to break out my reading glasses to stab the loop through the initial step of this simple braided fishing line knot. A huge plus!

When learning to tie other fishing knots for braid, be patient. Braid is not as forgiving knot-wise as monofilament.  It may take some practice learning to pull tag ends at the right time and wetting the knot will help.  Learning to tie the right knot when, is just as important as a fishing license because it may cost you a trophy fish someday.  When in doubt, pay attention to any instructions provided by the line manufacturer regarding the best knot for braided line.


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Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb

Andy Whitcomb is a columnist, outdoor humorist, and stressed-out Dad. He says there are “people who fish”… and there are “fishermen”.  One of the few things he knows is that he is a “fisherman”...  To the point it could be classified as borderline illness.  Sharing this obsession is rewarding, therapeutic. He likes to encourage people to “stop and smell the crappie."  Enjoys catching fish, but gets a greater thrill out of helping someone else hook up.
Born in Florida, but raised on the banks of Oklahoma farm ponds. Now relocated to western Pennsylvania. He has fished, worked, lived all around the US.  He has a B.S. in Zoology from Oklahoma State as well...
And he met his wife while electrofishing. He has been contributing weekly to www.takemefishing.org since 2011.