Fall Fishing Tips for Largemouth Bass by Region

With the change in seasons comes the need to change up your fishing strategy. Fall fishing can be fantastic if you make some adjustments to your technique as well as the spots you cover.

One general fall bass fishing tip is to pick up the speed of your retrieve — keeping in mind that most largemouth bass will be more inclined to chase lures and expend additional energy as water temperatures cool following the hot summer months.

If you'd like a few more fall fishing tips that are specific to your region of the U.S., check out the list of tips below.
 

  • Northeastern states. Take a shallow-running crankbait (one that runs down to a maximum depth of about 4 feet) and cast out towards lake points and feeder creeks. Look for clumps of green aquatic vegetation and work your lure around the outside edges. Baitfish and other prey that bass like to feed on will usually be found in these types of areas.

  • Midwestern states. When fall arrives in the Midwest, you may want to key in on suspended fish that are waiting to ambush prey along the side of a dock or other type of structure using a jig or spinnerbait.

  • Western states. Try fishing canyon reservoirs through mid-fall, focusing on shaded cuts along cliff walls and tapering rock points in reservoir creeks. Baitfish will migrate into creeks as the water temperatures begin to cool and largemouth bass will follow prey into these areas. Cast poppers along grass edges and jigs in spots with heavy vegetation to entice bass into biting.

  • Southern states. Working a jigging spoon along humps or creek channels can be a good technique to use in the Southern states during late fall and early winter since baitfish tend to school up in these types of spots. Texas-rigged plastic worms in junebug or green pumpkin colors will continue to work well in shallow lakes and ponds throughout autumn as well.


Debbie Hanson

Debbie Hanson

Debbie Hanson is an outdoor writer, blogger, and avid angler who has written articles on fishing and boating for publications such as USA Today Hunt & Fish and Game & Fish Magazine. She is a member of the Florida Outdoor Writers Association. Visit her personal blog at shefishes2.com and follow her on Twitter at @shefishes2.