4 Reasons to Explore New Fishing Spots

I'm always looking for new places to fish, especially in my home waters. Seasonal weather from winter Nor'easters to droughts followed by deluge changes the streams, rivers, and beaches. I brush up on those changes in the spring to learn what new areas might hold fish, and when the season kicks in I check them out. But I love to travel to fish, so here are four good reasons why it's important to take your show on the road.

Why New Fishing Spots Are Worth Finding

1. New skills are learned. Some fish jump, some fish sound, and others look for ways to break your line. Different types of fish behave differently, and if you're used to catching fish that head for deep water then you're in for a treat when they jump. You'll learn to bow to a jumping fish, when to put pressure on a running fish, and how to pull a fish out of rocks or tangles. And you'll learn new rigging techniques or use different types of tackle, too. Plus, you'll have a lot of fun.

2. New fish species are caught. Striped bass pull and stay deep, false albacore make long runs, snook sit deep in mangrove tangles, and largemouth bass snake their way through lily pads. Learning about new fish species, how they feed, where they live, and what they taste like makes us better fishermen. We become well-rounded and well-versed. 

3. Replace doldrums with hot fishing. In my home waters, the trout fishing slows when the water temperatures rise. Making a shift to bass and panfish at that time keeps the action hot.  In the summer it's fun to trade the freshwater for the salt, and the bluefish fishing is usually off the charts. Go where the action is and there will be fewer tough days on the water.

4. Find a new favorite spot. Check out our 2016 list of 100 best fishing spots. Some places to fish may be in your home state while others will inspire you to travel. Combine it with a family vacation and you're good to go.

This summer, take your show on the road. A fishing trip is the best way I know how.
Tom Keer

Tom Keer

Tom Keer is an award-winning writer who lives on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.  He is a columnist for the Upland Almanac, a Contributing Writer for Covey Rise magazine, a Contributing Editor for both Fly Rod and Reel and Fly Fish America, and a blogger for the Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation’s Take Me Fishing program.  Keer writes regularly for over a dozen outdoor magazines on topics related to fishing, hunting, boating, and other outdoor pursuits.  When they are not fishing, Keer and his family hunt upland birds over their three English setters.  His first book, a Fly Fishers Guide to the New England Coast was released in January 2011.  Visit him at www.tomkeer.com or at www.thekeergroup.com.